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Svyatoslav Stepanov
Svyatoslav Stepanov

IP Subnetting - From Zero to Guru: A Comprehensive and Practical Book by Paul Browning


IP Subnetting From Zero to Guru by Paul Browning: A Review




If you are a network engineer, administrator, or technician, you probably know that IP subnetting is one of the most essential and challenging skills to master. IP subnetting is the process of dividing a network into smaller subnetworks, each with its own range of IP addresses and network settings. IP subnetting can help you optimize network performance, security, and scalability, as well as troubleshoot network issues.




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But how do you learn IP subnetting? There are many online resources, courses, and books that claim to teach you this skill, but not all of them are effective or reliable. Some are too complex, some are too simplistic, and some are just plain wrong. You need a guide that can explain IP subnetting in a clear, concise, and practical way, with plenty of examples, exercises, and scenarios to help you apply your knowledge.


That's why I recommend IP Subnetting From Zero to Guru by Paul Browning. This book is one of the best resources I have found on IP subnetting. It covers everything you need to know about this topic, from the basics to the advanced techniques. It also provides you with a step-by-step method to learn IP subnetting effectively and efficiently.


In this article, I will review Paul Browning's book and show you how it can help you master IP subnetting. I will also answer some frequently asked questions about IP subnetting and the book. Let's get started!


What is IP subnetting?




Before we dive into the book, let's review what IP subnetting is and why it is important. IP subnetting is a technique that allows you to divide a network into smaller subnetworks, called subnets. Each subnet has its own range of IP addresses and network settings, such as a subnet mask, a default gateway, and a broadcast address.


IP addresses are numerical identifiers that allow devices to communicate over a network. They consist of two parts: a network part and a host part. The network part identifies the network that the device belongs to, while the host part identifies the device itself within that network.


A subnet mask is a binary number that determines how many bits of an IP address belong to the network part and how many belong to the host part. For example, a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 means that the first 24 bits of an IP address are the network part and the last 8 bits are the host part.


A default gateway is a device that acts as a bridge between different networks. It allows devices on one subnet to communicate with devices on another subnet or on the internet. For example, a router can be a default gateway for a subnet.


A broadcast address is a special IP address that allows a device to send a message to all devices on the same subnet. For example, a broadcast address of 192.168.1.255 means that any device with an IP address starting with 192.168.1 can receive the message.


Why is IP subnetting important?




IP subnetting is important for several reasons. First, it allows you to manage your network more efficiently and effectively. By dividing your network into smaller subnets, you can reduce network congestion, improve network performance, and isolate network problems.


Second, it allows you to enhance your network security and privacy. By creating subnets, you can control which devices can access which resources on your network. You can also apply different security policies and firewalls to different subnets, depending on their needs and functions.


Third, it allows you to scale your network easily and flexibly. By using subnets, you can accommodate more devices on your network without running out of IP addresses. You can also add or remove subnets as your network grows or changes, without affecting the rest of the network.


What are the benefits of IP subnetting?




Some of the benefits of IP subnetting are:



  • It improves network performance by reducing broadcast traffic and collisions.



  • It enhances network security by limiting the scope of attacks and breaches.



  • It increases network flexibility by allowing you to create subnets based on logical or functional criteria.



  • It saves network resources by optimizing the use of IP addresses and bandwidth.



  • It simplifies network troubleshooting by isolating network issues and faults.



How to learn IP subnetting from Paul Browning's book




Now that you know what IP subnetting is and why it is important, let's see how you can learn it from Paul Browning's book. Paul Browning is a former police officer who became a network engineer and trainer. He has over 20 years of experience in the IT industry and has taught thousands of students how to pass their Cisco exams and become successful network professionals.


Paul Browning's book, IP Subnetting From Zero to Guru, is a comprehensive and practical guide that teaches you everything you need to know about IP subnetting. It covers both IPv4 and IPv6 subnetting, as well as binary math, hexadecimal math, VLSM, CIDR, route summarization, and more. It also provides you with hundreds of examples, exercises, quizzes, and scenarios to help you practice and test your skills.


The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 covers the basics of IP subnetting, Part 2 covers advanced IP subnetting techniques, and Part 3 covers practical exercises and scenarios. Let's take a closer look at each part.


Who is Paul Browning and why should you trust him?




Paul Browning is a former police officer who became a network engineer and trainer. He has over 20 years of experience in the IT industry and has taught thousands of students how to pass their Cisco exams and become successful network professionals.


Paul Browning is the founder and owner of howtonetwork.com, a website that offers online courses, books, labs, and videos on various IT topics, such as networking, security, cloud computing, Linux, Python, and more. He is also the author of several best-selling books on networking, such as Cisco CCNA Simplified, Cisco CCNA in 60 Days, Cisco CCNP Simplified, and Cisco CCNA Security Simplified.


Paul Browning has a passion for teaching and sharing his knowledge with others. He has a knack for explaining complex concepts in simple terms and using real-world examples to illustrate his points. He also has a sense of humor and a friendly tone that make his books enjoyable to read.


You can trust Paul Browning because he knows what he is talking about and he knows how to teach it effectively. He has proven his expertise and credibility in the IT field and he has helped thousands of students achieve their goals and dreams.


What is the structure and content of the book?




Part 1: The basics of IP subnetting




Part 1 of the book covers the basics of IP subnetting. It starts with an introduction to binary math and hexadecimal math, which are essential for understanding how IP addresses and subnet masks work. It then explains the difference between IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, and how to convert between decimal, binary, and hexadecimal formats.


Next, it teaches you how to calculate subnet masks, network addresses, host addresses, and broadcast addresses for any given IP address and subnet mask. It also shows you how to use a subnetting cheat sheet and a subnetting calculator to speed up your calculations.


Finally, it introduces you to some common subnetting terms and concepts, such as classful and classless addressing, private and public IP addresses, network prefix and host suffix, and more.


Part 2: Advanced IP subnetting techniques




Part 2 of the book covers advanced IP subnetting techniques. It starts with an explanation of variable length subnet masking (VLSM), which is a technique that allows you to create subnets of different sizes within a network. It then teaches you how to use VLSM to optimize your network design and address allocation.


Next, it introduces you to classless inter-domain routing (CIDR), which is a technique that allows you to aggregate multiple subnets into a single routing entry. It then teaches you how to use CIDR to reduce the size of routing tables and improve network efficiency.


Finally, it shows you how to perform route summarization, which is a technique that allows you to combine multiple contiguous subnets into a single summary address. It then teaches you how to use route summarization to simplify network management and enhance network security.


Part 3: Practical exercises and scenarios




Part 3 of the book covers practical exercises and scenarios. It provides you with hundreds of questions, problems, and challenges that test your knowledge and skills on IP subnetting. It also provides you with detailed solutions and explanations for each question.


The exercises and scenarios cover various topics and situations related to IP subnetting, such as:



  • How to subnet a network given a certain number of hosts or subnets



  • How to assign IP addresses and subnet masks to devices on a network



  • How to verify IP addresses and subnet masks using ping and traceroute commands



  • How to troubleshoot IP addressing and subnetting issues using ipconfig and show commands



  • How to design a network using VLSM and CIDR



  • How to summarize routes using route summarization



  • How to configure routers and switches using IP addressing and subnetting



  • How to implement IPv6 addressing and subnetting



What are the main takeaways from the book?




The book teaches you everything you need to know about IP subnetting in a clear, concise, and practical way. By reading this book, you will learn:



  • What is IP subnetting and why is it important



  • How to perform binary math and hexadecimal math



  • How to calculate subnet masks, network addresses, host addresses, and broadcast addresses



  • How to use a subnetting cheat sheet and a subnetting calculator



  • What are the common subnetting terms and concepts



  • How to use VLSM, CIDR, and route summarization



  • How to apply your knowledge to real-world situations



  • How to master IPv4 and IPv6 subnetting



Conclusion and FAQs




In conclusion, IP Subnetting From Zero to Guru by Paul Browning is one of the best books on IP subnetting that I have ever read. It covers everything from the basics to the advanced techniques in a simple, straightforward, and engaging way. It also provides you with plenty of examples, exercises, quizzes, and scenarios to help you practice and test your skills.


If you want to master IP subnetting and become a network guru, I highly recommend that you get this book. You can find it on Amazon or on Paul Browning's website. You won't regret it!


To wrap up this article, I will answer some frequently asked questions about IP subnetting and the book. Here they are:


FAQs





  • What is the difference between IPv4 and IPv6?



IPv4 and IPv6 are two versions of the Internet Protocol, which is the set of rules that govern how devices communicate over a network. IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses, while IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses. IPv4 can support up to 4.3 billion addresses, while IPv6 can support up to 340 undecillion addresses. IPv6 was developed to overcome the limitations of IPv4, such as address exhaustion, security issues, and complexity.


  • What is the difference between classful and classless addressing?



Classful and classless addressing are two ways of organizing IP addresses and subnet masks. Classful addressing divides IP addresses into five classes (A, B, C, D, and E), each with a fixed network part and a variable host part. Classless addressing does not use classes, but instead uses a variable network prefix and a variable host suffix. Classless addressing allows more flexibility and efficiency in subnetting than classful addressing.


  • What is the difference between VLSM and CIDR?



VLSM and CIDR are two techniques that allow you to create subnets of different sizes within a network. VLSM stands for variable length subnet masking, which means that you can use different subnet masks for different subnets. CIDR stands for classless inter-domain routing, which means that you can use a single routing entry to represent multiple subnets. CIDR is based on VLSM, but it also allows you to aggregate subnets across network boundaries.


  • What is the difference between route summarization and route aggregation?



Route summarization and route aggregation are two terms that are often used interchangeably, but they have slightly different meanings. Route summarization is the process of combining multiple contiguous subnets into a single summary address. Route aggregation is the process of combining multiple non-contiguous subnets into a single routing entry. Both techniques aim to reduce the size of routing tables and improve network efficiency.


  • How can I practice IP subnetting?



The best way to practice IP subnetting is to use Paul Browning's book, IP Subnetting From Zero to Guru. The book provides you with hundreds of questions, problems, and challenges that test your knowledge and skills on IP subnetting. It also provides you with detailed solutions and explanations for each question. You can also use online tools, such as subnetting calculators, subnetting quizzes, and subnetting games, to practice IP subnetting.


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